How Much Garlic May be Useful For Cancer Prevention?

What is garlic?

Garlic is a vegetable (Allium sativum) that belongs to the Allium class of bulb-shaped plants, which also includes onions, chives, leeks, and scallions. Garlic is used for flavoring in cooking and is unique because of its high sulfur content. In addition to sulfur, garlic also contains arginine, oligosaccharides, flavonoids, and selenium, all of which may be beneficial to health (1).

The characteristic odor and flavor of garlic comes from sulfur compounds formed from allicin, the major precursor of garlic’s bioactive compounds, which are formed when garlic bulbs are chopped, crushed, or damaged (2). Bioactive compounds are defined as substances in foods or dietary supplements, other than those needed to meet basic nutritional needs, that are responsible for changes in health status.

Did you know that eating garlic on an empty stomach is actually  really effective in preventing and treating many diseases?

Scientists have found that when you consume garlic on an empty stomach, it will only increase its power, making it an extremely powerful natural antibiotic.    It happens  because bacteria is exposed and cannot defend itself from succumbing to its power.

Use Garlic Instead of Antibiotics

Garlic is composed of nitrogenous substances, sodium, potassium, selenium, calcium, magnesium, silicon, sulfuric, phosphoric acid, vitamin C, D, B, phytosterols, extractives, and essential oils. Additionally, garlic is rich in phytoncides, such as  allicin, which is formed by the mechanical destruction of plants, that is – crushing or grinding cloves of garlic. According to some researchers, allicin has a strong bacteriostatic effect which helps cure infections faster. Garlic can also fight fungal infections, which makes garlic a much more valuable medicine than that of many of today’s antibiotics.

Garlic: Nature’s Original Remedy

Garlic contains more than four hundred different mineral components including many antioxidants which, have a number of positive therapeutic properties.

The National Cancer Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health, does not recommend any dietary supplement for the prevention of cancer, but recognizes garlic as one of several vegetables with potential anticancer properties. Because all garlic preparations are not the same, it is difficult to determine the exact amount of garlic that may be needed to reduce cancer risk. Furthermore, the active compounds present in garlic may lose their effectiveness with time, handling, and processing. The World Health Organization’s (WHO) guidelines for general health promotion for adults is a daily dose of 2 to 5 g of fresh garlic (approximately one clove), 0.4 to 1.2 g of dried garlic powder, 2 to 5 mg of garlic oil, 300 to 1,000 mg of garlic extract, or other formulations that are equal to 2 to 5 mg of allicin.

How might garlic act to prevent cancer?

Protective effects from garlic may arise from its antibacterial properties (17) or from its ability to block the formation of cancer-causing substances (18), halt the activation of cancer-causing substances (19), enhance DNA repair (20), reduce cell proliferation, or induce cell death (10).